Nikki van Schyndel “Becoming Wild” Book Review

Becoming Wild Book Cover

Book Review by Patrick Wiley

When I received an unexpected email detailing the upcoming release of Nikki van Schyndel’s Becoming Wild, I was ecstatic. I had heard about the book seven years prior, but it had practically become an urban legend. Drawing upon my own experience and occasional lack of follow through, I had long ago concluded that the book was probably just a dream Nikki held that would never come to fruition. As is often the case, Nikki proved me wrong. Nearly a decade after the initial birthing of an idea, Nikki’s book has arrived. The . . . → Read More: Nikki van Schyndel “Becoming Wild” Book Review

Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part II – Trip Preparation plus Wilderness Emergency Response Protocol

Ben.Kleiber.Mt.Rainier.2013

Please click here to read critical introductory material in Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management including how to Engage the Frontal Cortex, recognize the difference between Perceived & Actual Risk, and mitigating the Eight Great Outdoor Hazards. These articles are designed to help the outdoor leaders cut the chaff, and start guiding students and clients with a solid foundation of knowledge.

If you would like intensive, hands-on training to become a highly effective outdoor leader, join us in mid June for our annual OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING EXPEDITION: Backpacking into Wolf Country course or stay all summer . . . → Read More: Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part II – Trip Preparation plus Wilderness Emergency Response Protocol

Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management

Artisans.Mt.Rainier.2013

If you would like intensive, hands-on training to become a highly effective outdoor leader, join us in mid June for our annual OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING EXPEDITION: Backpacking into Wolf Country course or stay all summer and graduate from one of our six unique residential summer Environmental Education Apprenticeships on Outdoor Leadership & Nature Guiding, on Ethnobotany & Herbalism, on Wildlife Conservation & Tracking, on Traditional Technology & Survival, or on Homesteading & Sustainability.

Habit of Engaging the Frontal Cortex

Calling all 20 something outdoor leaders! Don’t be like me. Realize that the neural insulation that connects our frontal lobes is . . . → Read More: Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management

Stinging Nettle: Harvesting, Processing and Recipes

Wolf Camp and the Wolf College co-owner and lead instructor, Kim Chisholm, demonstrates how to safely harvest stinging nettle leaves without gloves.

Those of us living in the Pacific Northwest (and many other regions around the world) are fortunate to be gifted every spring with an abundance of Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica). While it’s sting can be unpleasant, it teaches us to pay attention to our surroundings and I believe that’s a good thing. It also offers food, medicine and fiber if one knows how to properly harvest it. Here at the Wolf College, we adhere as closely as we can to the following Honorable Harvesting Guidelines for every plant we collect:

Wolf Camp and the Wolf College founder, Chris Chisholm, . . . → Read More: Stinging Nettle: Harvesting, Processing and Recipes

Tips for Eating Edible Insects

Charlie-Patrick-Chocolate-Mealworms

Young Man at Wolf Camp eating Chocolate Covered Mealworms

All of us have eaten insects, whether we knew it or not. As a kid, I even ate a worm on the playground to impress and gross out my friends. It’s not really a big deal. Unfortunately, adults who spent their whole lives growing up in western culture, now consider the notion of eating insects nothing short of repulsive. The truth of the matter is, insects have be an integral part of the food chain for millions of years, and as the United Nations just reported, we should start eating . . . → Read More: Tips for Eating Edible Insects

Bow Drill Fire Making Kits – Directions, Tips, Tricks, Pitfalls & Advice

Workshop Participant demonstrating excellent bowdrill form

Making traditional fire by friction, or “rubbing two sticks together” is real, and it’s more than a fun project: it’s also the most reliable way to start a fire once you learn how. How can an ancient way of starting fire be the most reliable if it is difficult? Well, it’s only difficult if you haven’t learned how. Once you learn, then it becomes the most reliable method because the coal you create is durable in cold, rainy, and windy conditions. Further, you can’t “run out” of fire lighting material if you know how to make traditional fire by friction. . . . → Read More: Bow Drill Fire Making Kits – Directions, Tips, Tricks, Pitfalls & Advice

The Best Way To Make A Fire: Bed, Pillow & Blanket plus Criss-Cross Construction

Guardian of the Fire by Joanna Powell Colbert

I almost made my own fire-making video, but then I saw this great video by Peter Kummerfeldt who does a superb job explaining the best way to make a fire at Outdoor Survival-Chapter 9-Fire. The only thing missing from his explanation is that fire needs shelter. In fact, fire has the following 4 requirements:

Fuel Air Shelter Ignition, which Peter describes as “heat” in his video. The second and third sections of my article below emphasize the need that fire has for shelter, something few people realize. First, watch Peter’s great fire-making video:

The Bed, Pillow & . . . → Read More: The Best Way To Make A Fire: Bed, Pillow & Blanket plus Criss-Cross Construction

Eating From The Seashore: Seaweeds & Shellfish of the Salish Sea

Chris-Chisholm-holding-edible-bullwhip-kelp

Group of day campers doing the seaweed challenge on Lummi Island.

A day on the seashore is fun, but a if you know some basic information about seaweeds and shellfish, then a day is never enough. In fact, you could live on the beach and never see everything that’s going on. “Edge” areas are always the places where the greatest number of species cross paths, and there is no greater edge than the seashore.

Seashores have been the ultimate place for me to teach classes. After 25 years of researching and teaching nature, and living near the beach, I . . . → Read More: Eating From The Seashore: Seaweeds & Shellfish of the Salish Sea

How to Cook Over a Campfire

WOLF-college-salmon-fry

It’s hard to think of anything that embodies the spirit of the great outdoors more than a good old-fashioned campfire under the stars. They provide us with warmth, light, and a great social atmosphere. There’s something deeply human about huddling around a raging fire with friends and family that brings us all closer together. Great food is one of the other few things in this world with the same power to rally us together and lift our spirits. Put them together and you have a guaranteed recipe for success. With a few basic tips, cooking over a campfire can be . . . → Read More: How to Cook Over a Campfire

Top Native Plants To Learn for Herbal Medicine: Part 2 of 2 – Flowering Plants

Advanced herbalist harvesting the chicory roots to roast for a coffee substitute (it's really good!).

Please click here to read critical introductory material in Top Native Plants To Learn for Herbal Medicine, Part 1 of 2 including the non-flowering plants, and my article on the Tenets of Herbal Medicine. These articles are designed to help the beginner cut the chaff, and start studying plants that will give a solid foundation of knowledge.

But it’s not even the whole plant you need to learn: the properties inside the plant are what’s important. To understand that, the best essay I’ve ever found is in the appendix of Botany in a Day by Thomas J. Elpel. If you . . . → Read More: Top Native Plants To Learn for Herbal Medicine: Part 2 of 2 – Flowering Plants

Top Native Plants To Learn for Herbal Medicine: Part 1 of 2

Rachel Edwards with Yarrow

The following plants which are native to the Pacific Northwest either 1) are scientifically proven to effectively treat health issues, or 2) I have personally tested to work. However, many of them should only be used under the care and advice of a naturopathic physician. Please seek medical advice and never rely on internet advice to treat problems.

Plant Properties You Need To Learn from Botany in a Day

This article is designed to help the beginner cut out the chaff, and start studying the plants that will give a solid foundation of knowledge. But it’s not even the whole . . . → Read More: Top Native Plants To Learn for Herbal Medicine: Part 1 of 2

Good-Bye Debris Hut, Hello to the Best Emergency Wilderness Survival Sheltering System: The Wolf College BIVOUAC BED & EAGLE’S NEST plus bivy bag recommendations

Wolf College founder Chris Chisholm demonstrating how to get out of the wind, away from the water, and up off cold ground in order to bivouac during a cold emergency survival situation.

Since the founding of the Boy Scouts and to the era of modern of survival schools, the “debris hut” has enjoyed great popularity. Unfortunately, the debris hut is not a practical design for emergency shelter.

To build a debris hut, you need 1) plenty of time, which no one in a survival situation has, 2) a mind sharp enough to employ woodcraft knowledge, which almost no one in a survival situation has, 3) an able body, which most people in survival situations do not have because of injury, deydration, hypothermia, etc., and 4) abundant wood and debris, which . . . → Read More: Good-Bye Debris Hut, Hello to the Best Emergency Wilderness Survival Sheltering System: The Wolf College BIVOUAC BED & EAGLE’S NEST plus bivy bag recommendations

Video & Blog: How To Use A Compass; Using Map & Compass; Recommended Compasses

514AemgL9BL._SL500_AA300_

Recommended Orienteering Compasses

First, it is critical to get a “spinning dial” compass that is clear plastic, although it’s also nice to get one that allows you to “set declination” which is a fancy way of saying that it has prominent red lines/arrows that clearly shows your magnetic declination so that every time you use your compass, you don’t have to squint your eyes to find +16 degrees or whatever your local declination happens to be. Click on the NOAA website to find the declination for your area.

We also recommend getting a mirrored compass because it will help . . . → Read More: Video & Blog: How To Use A Compass; Using Map & Compass; Recommended Compasses

Top 10 List of Natural Navigation, Lostproofing & Orienteering Tips, Tricks & Advice

Hiker Reading Old School Map - Artowrk by Joanna Powell Colbert

Wolf College Top 10 Lostproofing Skills Plan your route and risk manage it (empower all to say “stop, is it worth the risk, and if so, let’s make a mitigation plan) Every person needs to bring the 10 essentials. See http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/ten-essentials.html Always tell someone where you’re going and when you’ll be back. Then go there! If you do this, then you know someone (lots of someones) will come looking for you. Whenever you change your plans, stop and go back to number one. Never separate from your party unless there is a paramount reason and all parties go back . . . → Read More: Top 10 List of Natural Navigation, Lostproofing & Orienteering Tips, Tricks & Advice

The Most Important Plant – Cattails! Video of Finding, Harvesting, Transplanting & Cooking Cattails

Instructor Chris Chisholm gathers the tasty Rhizomes from a Cattail pond.

Wolf College founder and co-owner Chris Chisholm finds red-wing blackbirds in cattail pond, harvests cattail rhizomes, transplants the cattail into the Wolf College bioswale rain garden, and cooks cattails for carbohydrate loading. . . . → Read More: The Most Important Plant – Cattails! Video of Finding, Harvesting, Transplanting & Cooking Cattails

Top 10 Most Important Wild Edible Food Plants

Salmonberry Basket by M. Andrew Twele of the Wolf College

Salmonberry Basket by M. Andrew Twele at the Wolf College

First Plants to Learn

No plant is more important than any other, just like no person’s life should be more important than anyone else’s. But all of us who publish books about plants make choices as to which plants to highlight, and which to leave out during the editing process. My choice of plants is a practical one, and I should have named this article the “Plants Which Have the Most Critical Ethnobotanical Uses in North America ” if it weren’t such a cumbersome statement.

Deciding which plants to . . . → Read More: Top 10 Most Important Wild Edible Food Plants

Emergency & Wilderness Survival – Tips, Suggestions & Advice

The Wolf College Order of Emergency Wilderness Survival Chart

The Opposite of Panic

The author demonstrating how to breathe in case of emergency. You can’t help but to suck air back in if you do this. Getting enough oxygen to your brain and extremities reduces panic and warms you up as well.

Experts say “don’t panic” in case of emergency, but we are biologically wired with a “freeze, fight or flee” response, so the only people who don’t automatically panic are trained emergency responders. So what are the rest of us to do?

When we panic, adrenaline floods our system, and our “lower thinking” brain stem is stimulated. . . . → Read More: Emergency & Wilderness Survival – Tips, Suggestions & Advice

First Monthly Outdoor Skills Newsletter publishes March 4th, 2013

Outdoor-Skills-Newsletter-Cover-250

Sign up for our First Tuesday of the Month Outdoor Skills Newsletter

The newsletter contains deals and information not available anywhere else! Examples include:

– Where to find current hot wildlife spots and more – Previews of program ideas and upcoming skills videos – Mini skills newsletter workshops from our workshop hand-outs – Special program discount offers for things like helping us design a newsletter cover:)