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Course Catalog

Course Catalog

John Kallas’s “Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate” Book Review

Book Review by Hannah

John Kallas’s Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate is one of my favorite wild edible field guides. I like to think of this book as a primer in foraging because it details how to find, harvest, process and eat over 23 different wild plants.

Edible Wild Plants is a comprehensive guide that addresses many of the wild edibles that we can find first and foremost in our backyards. Instead of planting conventional lettuce and other nutrient-poor plants, we can eat the “weeds” — the nutritious wild greens that already grow in our backyards, . . . → Read More: John Kallas’s “Edible Wild Plants: Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate” Book Review

Rosemary Gladstar’s “Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use” Book Review

Book Review by Hannah

Rosemary Gladstar’s Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use is a staple book to have at home. It is suitable for all levels of herbal experience and contains recipes applicable for all members of the family.

If you are a beginner herbalist or curious to know more about the many uses of plants, this is the book for you. If you are an experienced herbalist, this book contains insight, advice, and new and old recipes from one of the most significant members of the American herbal community.

Who . . . → Read More: Rosemary Gladstar’s “Medicinal Herbs: A Beginner’s Guide: 33 Healing Herbs to Know, Grow, and Use” Book Review

Nikki van Schyndel “Becoming Wild” Book Review

Book Review by Patrick Wiley

When I received an unexpected email detailing the upcoming release of Nikki van Schyndel’s Becoming Wild, I was ecstatic. I had heard about the book seven years prior, but it had practically become an urban legend. Drawing upon my own experience and occasional lack of follow through, I had long ago concluded that the book was probably just a dream Nikki held that would never come to fruition. As is often the case, Nikki proved me wrong. Nearly a decade after the initial birthing of an idea, Nikki’s book has arrived. The . . . → Read More: Nikki van Schyndel “Becoming Wild” Book Review

Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part II – Trip Preparation plus Wilderness Emergency Response Protocol

Please click here to read critical introductory material in Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management including how to Engage the Frontal Cortex, recognize the difference between Perceived & Actual Risk, and mitigating the Eight Great Outdoor Hazards. These articles are designed to help the outdoor leaders cut the chaff, and start guiding students and clients with a solid foundation of knowledge.

If you would like intensive, hands-on training to become a highly effective outdoor leader, join us in mid June for our annual OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING EXPEDITION: Backpacking into Wolf Country course or stay all . . . → Read More: Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part II – Trip Preparation plus Wilderness Emergency Response Protocol

Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management

If you would like intensive, hands-on training to become a highly effective outdoor leader, join us in mid June for our annual OUTDOOR LEADERSHIP TRAINING EXPEDITION: Backpacking into Wolf Country course or stay all summer and graduate from one of our six unique residential summer Environmental Education Apprenticeships on Outdoor Leadership & Nature Guiding, on Ethnobotany & Herbalism, on Wildlife Conservation & Tracking, on Traditional Technology & Survival, or on Homesteading & Sustainability.

Habit of Engaging the Frontal Cortex

Calling all 20 something outdoor leaders! Don’t be like me. Realize that the neural insulation that connects our frontal lobes is . . . → Read More: Hiking & Backpacking Leadership Part I – Outdoor Risk Management

Identify Birds Quickly by Sight, Sound & Behavior using Bird Feeders, Field Guides & Apps

Bald Eagle photo by Kimberly M Chisholm. Bald eagles have a distinct companion call in flight when returning to the nest, among other vocalizations.

Wolf Camp lead instructor Patrick Wiley birding in Northern Virginia during Wolf College trip to Washington DC

This article is being published in honor of the 2014 Great Backyard Bird Count. Check out its great video instructions and online submissions tool.

Identifying Birds by Sound & Behavior

If you’re not already excited by birds and bird voices, check out my previous article on bird language which will teach you when predators are lurking around, when birds are mating, when chicks have hatched, where the exact edges of their territories lie, and so much more.

Fortunately, recognition of bird . . . → Read More: Identify Birds Quickly by Sight, Sound & Behavior using Bird Feeders, Field Guides & Apps

Reviews of the Top 10 Professional Wildlife Tracking Books

It’s been a long time coming. The great Haitian-American naturalist John James Audubon hand-painted The Birds of America between 1927-1939 and with it, he set the standard for modern field guides. Now there are several excellent field guides to the birds, but it has only been recently that field guides to plants and other animals have risen to that level of user-friendly excellence. The following is a list of my Top 10 wildlife tracking book compilations, with must-have field guides in bold:

1948 Ellsworth Jaeger: Tracks and Trailcraft by Ellsworth Jaeger, first published in 1948, is the first . . . → Read More: Reviews of the Top 10 Professional Wildlife Tracking Books

How to Cook for Backpacking Trips

Instructor-Charlie-Borrowman-backpacking-in-wolf-country.jpg

When most of us think of backpacking, we think of majestic mountains, lush forests, and birds singing over babbling streams, while the fresh smells of nature delight our senses. Not every image invoked is so pleasant, however. Many of us think of the lamentable prospect of hiking all day long, just to sit down to a freeze-dried package of what, we can only hope, was chicken at some point, served with bland white rice or beans. Luckily, this doesn’t have to be so! With a few simple tricks, we can turn the nightly “UGH!” into a resounding “Awwww yeah!” and . . . → Read More: How to Cook for Backpacking Trips